What voters want politicians to achieve

In September 2017, in a regular survey of the Australian general public, foreseechange asked respondents about the likelihood that particular events would occur in the next year.

One of those was that Malcolm Turnbull would be replaced as Prime Minister.  The Wisdom of the Masses estimated likelihood was a 53% chance.  As a federal election was unlikely in the following year, this result means that it was perceived to be a slightly better than 50/50 chance that Turnbull would be dumped by his own party.

Just under a year later, this seems almost certain to happen today.

Another component of the foreseechange survey is canvassing opinions on the issues people feel they will be most concerned about in the foreseeable future.

Number one in June 2018 was the cost of living.  Despite consumer price inflation being only 2%, at the bottom of the Reserve Bank of Australia’s target zone, consumer price expectations are over 4% and wages are only growing by 2%.  Politicians have to do something about this gap if they want to be popular (so to for employers!).

Of course, there are many other issues that segments of the population are concerned about, such as housing affordability, traffic congestion, and climate change.

Malcolm Turnbull’s likely replacement as PM seems unwilling to do anything about climate change, for example.

If politicians do not understand, and act on, the concerns of all Australians then the revolving door for Australian prime ministers since 2009 looks set to continue at a fast pace.

Charlie Nelson

 

 

An early federal election for Australia

It seems likely that Malcolm Turnbull will call an early election for August 2018. While losing 30 Newspolls in a row, the gap is not large and could easily be closed. In fact, the recent Fairfax IPSOS Poll has the two party preferred vote close to even – depending on how preferences are allocated.

The Turnbull government has made it clear that there will be personal tax cuts in the May 2018 budget. This will make some voters more happy and will tend to boost the economy. Employment growth has been very strong, but seems to be weakening (growth has been temporarily boosted by the National Disability Insurance Scheme rollout). A tax cut fillip may just extend the good employment news for another few months. Good old Keynesian fiscal stimulus

Today Malcolm Turnbull announced $5 billion to build the airport to city rail link we have been waiting for these last 50 years. The funding has to be matched by the Victorian State government who face the polls in November 2018. How can they refuse?

Today there are reports that Malcolm has asked the party machine to have all pre-selections finalised soon.

The timing of the federal election is constrained by the timing of state elections in Victoria (November 2018) and New South Wales (March 2019) and by the need to have a half Senate election within the next 12 months.

Prime Ministers tend to call elections when they expect the economic news to be best and that will probably be in August 2018.

On the subject of political opinion polls, they are becoming less accurate. See my article in my book Forecasting: the essential skills.

Charlie Nelson